Simple Diaper & Linen: Caring for Baby and Planet

Simple Diaper & Linen: Caring for Baby and Planet

Upon learning that one baby uses about 6,000 diapers during their diapering years, Angie Gregory knew she would use cloth with her own babies. After her second child was born, the entrepreneur had the idea to start an eco-friendly cloth diapering service that would align her everyday values of being home with her family, using natural materials on her babies, and reducing her carbon footprint. In 2009, Simple Diaper & Linen was born.

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Shelburne Arts Co-Operative: Making More Than Art

Shelburne Arts Co-Operative: Making More Than Art

“It’s like being a part of a family,” says Laurie Wheeler of the Shelburne Arts Cooperative. The close-knit feeling created by the co-op is impressive given its size and scope: It has grown from eight founding members in 1998 to over 60 members today, the majority of whom live in Franklin County, though membership extends throughout the Valley. 

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Pickles to the People: Creating a Community Around Fermentation

Pickles to the People: Creating a Community Around Fermentation

When Dan Rosenberg began experimenting with making pickles in Boston in 1999, he did not realize how far his relationship with fermented foods would take him. He studied traditional diets throughout the world, the benefits of raw, fermented foods throughout many of these cultures, and learned some new fermenting skills in a NOFA workshop that left him eager to experiment with winter trials of sauerkraut, turnips and cucumbers. 

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Last Bite: Quince

Last Bite: Quince

Confession time: Quince make us weak in the knees. These incredibly fragrant fruits (once upon a time, they were used as pomanders, perfuming many a linen closet) resemble apples, but their golden, russeted, occasionally fuzzy skins encase a fruit with a split personality. High in tannins, their raw flesh is bitter and astringent, but after a poaching in sugar or honey the flesh turns golden-pink and lusciously tender. 

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Are You There God? It’s Me, The Tuesday Market Manager

Are You There God? It’s Me, The Tuesday Market Manager

For the past two months I’ve woken up nearly every day thinking about rain. Weather, and talking about it, is not something any native New Englander is a stranger to––but this is different. My Instagram feed has started to fill up with images of dust, and I’m keeping one eye on the sky these days. No rain means no food, no food means no customers, and no customers means that we’ll be left struggling to keep our fledgling farmers’ market together through another week of slow sales.

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Eat It Up!

Eat It Up!

Whole-food cooking is like foraging in your own refrigerator. It’s seeing the leaves you looked past before, noticing the silver (or strawberry, or mustard) lining in a jar you thought was spent. It’s putting more of those bits and pieces to work in the kitchen rather than in the compost pile.

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The Power of Co-Operation

The Power of Co-Operation

My parents were of the meat-and-potatoes generation, but I took a different road. I laughed at my parents’ jokes about my sprouts and greens alongside the gallons of milk and margarine in the refrigerator. I saw the Genesee Co-op Natural Foodstore in Rochester as my one way to access healthy, organic foods that weren't available in supermarkets. At the co-op, I also discovered a vibrant community and warm connections. 

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Valley Green Feast: From Farm to Front Door

Valley Green Feast: From Farm to Front Door

On a sweltering Friday in July, I drive out to Breezy Acres Farm in Granby, home to Valley Green Feast (VGF), a year-round food delivery service. I spend the afternoon with Rebekah Hanlon and Bekki Szlosek, two of three worker-owners behind the cooperative. Before founder Jessica Harwood left the then-solo operation in 2010 after running it for three years, she turned it into to a cooperative model to ensure her initial vision lived on.

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Humble Luxury

Humble Luxury

On my wife Angie’s and my first date, I picked her up at her grandmother’s home on the east side of Milwaukee, where she was living while attending college.  I rang the bell at the back door and she ushered me into the tiny hallway.  She quickly grabbed her coat off the hook and, mildly flustered, said, “Smell that?  I have to eat that later.”  It was the unmistakable fragrance of cabbage.

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Hazed and Enthused: A Cloudy Forecast is Good For Beer Lovers

Hazed and Enthused: A Cloudy Forecast is Good For Beer Lovers

India pale ale, or IPA, is by far the most popular craft beer style in the United States today. Noted for its hoppy bitterness, the IPA’s growing market share has prompted brewers to experiment with new hops, yeast strains, and processes to improve and differentiate their beers. 

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Satisfied by the Forest: From Tiny Acorns, Our Needs Are Fed

Satisfied by the Forest: From Tiny Acorns, Our Needs Are Fed

Growing up, I celebrated my birthdays with Rainbow Chip frosted cakes from a box. There is more vapid pleasure than lasting gratification in those cakes, and no matter how much Rainbow Chip frosting I eat, I always long for more, chasing the first taste like a hungry ghost. I learned in 2009 that food indulgence could be a multidimensional experience: nutritive, richly delicious, decisively satisfying, and spiritually sea changing—a revelation to my processed-food youth.

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