Edible Radio: Lost Recipes of Prohibition

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On this episode of The Kitchen Workshop, Mary Reilly (the publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley) speaks with Matthew Rowley. Matthew is the author of Moonshine! and the new book Lost Recipes of Prohibition.  He write about folk distillation and illicit spirits. 

Mary and Matthew spoke about the amazing Prohibition-era notebook that Matthew used as the foundation for his book, drinking during our country's "dry" period, rum shrub (see below for a recipe) and ice liquor. 

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Rum Shrub

750 ml 151 proof rum

3.25 ounces fresh orange juice

3.25 ounces fresh lemon juice

Peel of 1/2 lemon, pith removed

Peel of 1/2 orange, pith removed

13 ounces sugar

16 ounces water

Combine the rum, juices and citrus peels in a large swing-top jar. Seal and let macerate 24 hours in a cool place. Meanwhile, make a syrup by heating the sugar and water in a nonreactive pot. When cool, combine with the strained rum mixture, stir to blend and bottle.

The West Indian Shrub  is identical, except that it uses fresh lime juice in place of the lemon and orange juices. 

Edible Radio: Preserving the Japanese Way with Nancy Singleton Hachisu

9781449450885On this episode of The Kitchen Workshop, Mary Reilly (the publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley) speaks with Nancy Singleton Hachisu, the author of Japanese Farm Food and the new book Preserving the Japanese Way

Nancy and Mary talked about Japanese pickling and preserving. Nancy shared her method for making miso and discussed where to find good miso, if you're not making your own.

Learn more about Nancy's books and appearances at nancysingletonhachisu.com.

Find miso and and koji at South River Miso, and many Japanese ingredients at Gold Mine Natural Foods.

Nancy was kind enough to share her recipe for miso squid with us. Find it below.

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Miso Squid – Ika No Misozuke

Serves 6

We are fortunate to have a constant supply of very fresh squid in Japan. If you have any doubts about the freshness of your squid, you might want to perform a boiling water–ice bath operation a couple of times by pouring a stream of boiling water over the squid for 10 seconds, then plunging in a bowl of ice water to refresh (yudoshi). Also squid is one sea creature that does not suffer much from freezing, so frozen squid is an alternative to fresh. Miso tends to burn, thus low-ember coals or far away from the broiler is best. Squid stands up to the miso and the long, slow cook more than fish, as its surface is naturally taut and becomes slightly caramelized. Utterly delectable as a before-dinner snack or appetizer. Also excellent cold the following day.

5 small fresh squid (about pound/150 g each)

½ teaspoon fine sea salt

1 tablespoon sake

4 tablespoons brown rice or barley miso

1 to 2 small dried red chiles, sliced into fine rings

Position a cutting board immediately to the left of the kitchen sink. Set the bag of squid directly behind the board and a wire-mesh strainer in the sink itself. Remove the squid from the bag and lay them on the board. Gently dislodge the inner gastric sacs from the bodies by running your finger around the perimeter of the inside body walls and pull the sac out in one piece. Reserve the sacs and some of the meat for making shiokara, if you like, otherwise, toss into the strainer for later composting. Stick your finger inside the body and pull out the plastic-like stick, called the gladius and set the bodies in the sink to wash.

Pat the squid bodies well with a clean dish towel. Drape across a dinner plate, and sprinkle all sides with the salt. Stash in the fridge for 1 to 2 hours uncovered.

Muddle the sake into the miso and spread over both surfaces of the squid bodies with a small rubber scraper; smooth around the tentacles (still attached at the top) with your fingers. Return the squid to the refrigerator for 2 or 3 hours more for a deep, dark taste. Grill slowly over low-ember coals or on a rack set in the third slot from the top of an oven broiler for about 5 minutes on each side. Julienne and eat as is for a before-dinner snack.

VARIATION: The laconic gentleman who hid behind dark glasses at the Wajima air-dried fish place parted with his favorite way to make squid: Marinate in soy sauce for 30 minutes and grill. Simple. I like to serve it with a squeeze of yuzu or Meyer lemon.

From Preserving the Japanese Way: Traditions of Salting, Fermenting, and Pickling for the Modern Kitchen, by Nancy Singleton Hachisu/Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLC

Cheesemaking, the Natural Way

sm_TheArtofNaturalCheesemaking_LoResOn The Kitchen Workshop, Mary Reilly, Edible Pioneer Valley publisher and editor in chief, sat down with David Asher. David runs the Black Sheep School of Cheesemaking in British Columbia. He follows traditional and natural methods of cheesemaking and doesn't rely on the freeze-dried cheese cultures that make up so much of today's cheesemaking. Mary and David talked about cheesemaking methods, rennet types (During they veer off into a detailed discussion of rennet production and GMO rennet. For more information on GMO-produced rennets, read Changing Times for Wisconsin Cheesemakers from Edible Milwaukee.)

Listen to learn how David makes paneer and chevre at home. Recipes for both are below. These recipes have been adapted from David Asher's The Art of Natural Cheesemaking (July 2015) and are printed with permission from Chelsea Green Publishing.

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PANEER

I learned how to make paneer at a gurdwara (a Sikh temple). The original community kitchens, gurd- waras open up their temples to the public and serve free vegetarian meals known as langar to anyone, regardless of gender, creed, or need, almost any day of the week. At the Golden Temple in Amritsar, India, the most holy Sikh temple, tens of thousands of pilgrims are served wholesome meals every single day.

If you haven’t been to a gurdwara for a meal, I highly recommend it. It’s an important cultural experience, and an excellent way to get to know your neighbors and enjoy a meal with folks off the street. If you don’t want to accept a free meal, the temples will gladly accept donations, or your help in the kitchen.

Gurdwaras make phenomenal homemade Punjabi food, often featuring homemade paneer. When I learned that this temple I visited made its own cheese, I asked the community if I could volunteer in the kitchen and see how it was made. Expert cheesemakers, the Punjabis in the kitchen were very instructive and happy to share their skills. I later learned that many Punjabi households make their own paneer, even after immigrating to North America (you’ve probably seen them buying gallons and gallons of milk at the supermarket and wondered how they were going to drink it all). They should be an example for us all!

This is an adaptation of the gurdwara’s recipe, scaled down from the 25 or so gallons (100 L) of milk that they transformed into cheese in their kitchen! The 25 gallons of milk produced about 25 pounds (10 kg) of cheese, and all that warm cheese, sitting in the strainer, pressed itself firm. When making this recipe at home, you’ll probably not be making as much, and you’ll need to set up a cheese press to press your paneer firm.

Queso fresco, literally “fresh cheese” in Spanish, is a similarly made heat-acid cheese that’s commonly consumed across Mexico and Latin America. Essentially paneer made on a different continent, the recipe for queso fresco is virtually identical to its Indian cousin.

Paneer_p118_credit-KellyBrown2015

Ingredients

1 gallon (4 L) milk—and almost any milk will do!
1⁄2 cup (120 mL) vinegar (or 1 cup [240 mL] lemon juice, or 1⁄2 gallon [2 L] yogurt or kefir)
1 tablespoon (15 mL) salt (optional)

Equipment

2-gallon (8-L) capacity heavy-bottomed pot
Wooden spoon
Medium-sized wire strainer
Steel colander
Large bowl

Homemade cheese press—two matching yogurt containers, one with holes punched through from the inside with a skewer

Time Frame

2 hours

Yield

Makes about 1 1⁄2 pounds (700 g) cheese

Technique

Bring the milk to a boil over medium-high heat.
Be sure to stir the pot nonstop as the milk warms to prevent its scorching on the bottom; the more time you spend stirring, the less time you’ll spend scouring! As well, stirring promotes presence of mind and keeps you focused on the milk, which may boil over if forgotten.

Let the milk rest by cooling it in its pot for a minute or two. Letting the milk settle will slow its movement and help ensure good curd formation.

Pour in the vinegar or lemon juice, and gently stir the pot once or twice to ensure an even mixing of the acid. Do not overstir; the paneer curds are sensitive when they’re fresh and can break apart if overhandled. Watch as the curds separate from the whey . . .

Let the curds settle for 5 minutes. As they cool, the curds will continue to come together. As they become firm, they will be more easily strained from the pot.

Carefully strain the curds: With a wire-mesh strainer, scoop out the curds from the pot, and place them to drain in a colander resting atop a bowl that will catch the warm whey. Pouring the whole pot through the colander is not recom- mended, as the violent mixing that results can make it difficult for the cheese to drain.

Add spices or salt (optional). If you wish to flavor your paneer or queso fresco, consider adding various herbs or spices to the curds before they are pressed. Now is also the best time to add salt.

Press the curds (optional): Transfer the paneer curds from the colander into a form while they are still warm, and place the cheese-filled form atop a draining rack. Fill up the follower with hot whey, and place atop the form to press the curds firm. The paneer is ready as soon as the curd has cooled. It can be taken out of the form and used right away, or refrigerated in a covered container for up to 1 week. Paneer, unlike other cheeses, can also be frozen.

Recipe adapted from David Asher's The Art of Natural Cheesemaking (July 2015) and printed with permission from Chelsea Green Publishing.

CHEVRE

sm_Chevre_credit-KellyBrown2015

The cultural circumstances within which chèvre evolved make the production of this cheese ideally suited to our modern times. With the many distractions and diversions in our lives, it is often difficult to find dedicated time for cheesemaking; chèvre’s simplicity helps it find a place in our daily rhythms.

Cows’ milk can be used in this recipe in place of goats’ milk: the soft and creamy curd that results is firmer than yogurt cheese and is sometimes called cream cheese, fromage frais, or Neufchâtel, though that final name is an American bastardization of a very different bloomy-rinded French cheese. The long fermentation of the cows’ milk allows its cream to rise, creating a beautiful layer of creamy curd atop the whiter curd below.

Chèvre is excellent on its own but also serves as a delicious canvas for adding many other herbs, spices, and flavors. Roasted or raw garlic, cracked pepper, preserved lemons, even fruit preserves all pair well with chèvre. But be sure to add them at the end of the cheesemaking process, when the cheese is salted and drained; if the flavorings are added too soon, their flavor will flow away with the whey.

Chèvre is generally eaten fresh in North America, so it is a little-known fact that it can also be aged! Chèvre is the foundation of an entire class of aged cheeses that start as this fresh cheese.

Ingredients

1 gallon (4 L) good goats’ milk
1⁄4 cup (60 mL) kefir or active whey
1⁄4 dose rennet (I use less than 1⁄16 tablet WalcoRen calf’s rennet for 1 gallon milk)
1 tablespoon (15 mL) good salt

Equipment

1-gallon (4-L) capacity heavy-bottomed pot
Wooden spoon
Ladle
Du-rag or other good cheesecloth
Steel colander
Large bowl

Time Frame

30 minutes to make; 2 days total

Yield

Makes about 11⁄2 pounds (700 g) chèvre

Technique

Warm the goats’ milk to around 90°F (32°C) on a low heat, stirring occasionally to keep it from scorching.

Stir in a cheesemaking starter culture: Pour in the kefir or whey and mix it in thoroughly.

Stir in a small amount of rennet: Dissolve the quarter dose of rennet in 1⁄4 cup (60 mL) cold water. Mix it into the warm milk gently
but thoroughly.

Leave at room temperature, covered, for 24 hours. After the long fermentation period, the curd will shrink and sink to the bottom of the pot.

Ladle the curds into a cheesecloth-lined colander perched over a bowl to catch the whey. Tie the cheesecloth into a bag, and simply leave it in the colander to drain.

Drain for at least 6 hours, at room temperature. Cover with a clean towel if need be to keep flies from landing on it. Be sure that the curds are well suspended above the level of the whey.

Salt the curds: Open up the cheesecloth bag and sprinkle 1 tablespoon (15 mL) salt over the surface of the cheese. With a wooden spoon, mix the salt into the cheese thoroughly.

Tie up the cheesecloth bag, and let the salted curds drain for another hour or two. Once the cheese feels quite dry, it’s ready to eat, or have herbs or spices added to it.

Keep chèvre in the refrigerator if you don’t eat it right away. It will keep for at least 2 weeks.

Recipe adapted from David Asher's The Art of Natural Cheesemaking (July 2015) and printed with permission from Chelsea Green Publishing.

EDIBLE RADIO: The Nourished Kitchen with Jennifer McGruther

McGr_Nourished KitchenMary Reilly of Edible Pioneer Valley spoke with Jennifer McGruther, blogger, writer and author of The Nourished Kitchen. They talked about home-made soda and fermenting leafy greens. 

Jennifer shared her recipes for beet kvass and creamed collards with us - find them below. 

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Photo courtesy of Kevin McGruther

 

Beet kvass with ginger and mandarin

Beet kvass tastes of the earth, faintly reminiscent of mineral-rich soil with a mild sweetness that fades to sour as the tonic ferments and ages. Like many traditional foods, beet kvass, which is nothing more than the juice of fermented beets, can overwhelm the palate of those unaccustomed to the strong flavors of the Old World. Yet, with time, many people find that they develop a yen for the robust earthiness and sour-sweet flavor of the tonic.

My interest in other homemade sodas and herbal tonics waxes and wanes, but my love of beet kvass remains constant. I like to serve it over ice, diluted with sparkling or still mineral water. While I often prepare plain beet kvass, I also find that ginger and mandarin oranges temper its earthiness, providing a nice variation. The beet’s betacyanin content not only gives beets and this kvass their characteristic color, but it also provides potent antioxidants.

beet kvass with ginger and mandarin Makes about 6 cups

1/4 cup strained Ginger and Wild Yeast Starter for Homemade Sodas (page 289)

2 teaspoons finely ground unrefined sea salt

6 cups water, plus more as needed

3 pounds beets, peeled and chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

2 mandarin oranges (with the skin on), sliced into 1/4-inch-thick rounds

2 tablespoons peeled and freshly grated ginger

Pour the strained starter into a large pitcher, then whisk in the salt and water.

Put the beets, mandarins, and ginger in a 1-gallon fermentation crock. Pour in the liquid until the crock is full within 1 inch of its lip and the beets are completely submerged, adding additional water as necessary. Weigh the beets down with a sterilized stone, a glass or stoneware weight, or other utensil small enough to fit within your crock but heavy enough to act as a weight. Seal the crock and allow the kvass to ferment at room temperature for at least 7 days. Taste the kvass, and if you prefer a stronger or sourer flavor, continue fermenting for another week.

Strain the kvass and funnel it into pint‑size flip-top bottles. Discard the mandarins, but reserve the beets, if you like, and serve them as you would a pickle or other fermented vegetable. Store the kvass in the refrigerator for up to 1 year, noting that it may thicken slightly as it ages.

Creamed collard greenscollared greens

There’s an old-fashioned charm to the sturdy collard green, whose tough stems and broad leathery leaves spring from garden beds throughout the year. Despite near year-round availability, collards are at their best in the cold months after the first frost, which sweetens the otherwise notoriously bitter green. Here, heavy cream and caramelized onions add luxurious sweetness to counterbalance the collards’ briny undertones.

Serves 4 t o 6

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced

2 bunches collard greens, about 24 ounces, stems removed and leaves coarsely chopped

1 cup heavy cream

1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Melt the butter in a cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. When it froths, decrease the heat to medium, stir in the onion, and fry until fragrant and a bit caramelized at the edges, 6 to 8 minutes.

Toss the chopped collards into the skillet and cook, stirring until slightly wilted, about 2 minutes. Decrease the heat to medium-low, stir in the heavy cream, and simmer for 5 to 6 minutes, until the cream is reduced by half and thickened. Sprinkle with the nutmeg and serve.

 

EDIBLE RADIO: A love for cookies with Mindy Segal

Sega_Cookie LoveKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks with Mindy Segal about her book Cookie Love, treating a cookie like a meal and building  your cookie making pantry. Mindy is the author of Cookie Love and the proprietor and pastry creator of Hot Chocolate Restaurant and Dessert Bar in Chicago. She has graciously shared her recipe for Fleur de Sel Shortbread with Vanilla Halvah.

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FLEUR DE SEL SHORTBREAD WITH VANILLA HALVAH

Segal_MindyI AM ALWAYS ON a quest to find more ways to use halvah in desserts. Coffee, chocolate, and cocoa nibs are my usual pairings with the Middle Eastern sesame confection, but one day I shifted gears in favor of vanilla and fleur de sel. It worked—halvah anchored the vanilla-flecked frosting, for a sweet, salty, nutty result. To finish the cookies, I dip them partially in dark milk chocolate and then place a shaving of halvah on top. The frosting is seasoned well to balance its sweetness, but because the cookies themselves carry a noticeable salt level, you may prefer to add less. If using a sea salt that is not as light and flaky as Murray River (see page 267 for a description of the salt), reduce the salt by 1 tablespoon.

To cut out the cookies, you will need a rectangular cutter approximately 13⁄4 by 21⁄2 inches. To pipe the frosting, you will need the Ateco tip #32.

Makes approximately 28 sandwich cookies.

SHORTBREAD

11⁄2 cups plus 2 tablespoons (13 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature

11⁄4 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted

2 extra-large egg yolks, at room temperature

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons sea salt flakes

FROSTING

8 ounces plain or vanilla halvah, cubed

2 ounces white chocolate, melted

11⁄4 cups (10 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup confectioners’ sugar, sifted

1⁄2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt

1⁄2 teaspoon sea salt flakes, or to taste

TO FINISH

Piece of plain or vanilla halvah, for garnish

8 ounces milk chocolate, melted

Fleur de Sel Shortbread with Vanilla Halvah CookieStep #1: Make the Shortbread

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the butter on medium speed for 5 to 10 seconds. Add the sugar and mix on low speed to incorporate. Increase the speed to medium and cream the butter mixture until it is aerated and looks like frosting, 3 to 4 minutes. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula to bring the batter together.

Put the yolks in a small cup or bowl and add the vanilla.

In a bowl, whisk together the flour and salt.

On medium speed, add the yolks, one at a time, and mix until the batter resembles cottage cheese, approximately 5 seconds for each yolk. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula to bring the batter together. Mix on medium speed for 20 to 30 seconds to make nearly homogeneous.

Add the flour mixture all at once and mix on low speed until the dough just comes together but still looks shaggy, approxi- mately 30 seconds. Do not overmix. Remove the bowl from the stand mixer. With a plastic bench scraper, bring the dough completely together by hand.

Stretch two sheets of plastic wrap on a work surface. Divide the dough in half and place each half on a piece of the plastic wrap. Pat each half into a rectangle, wrap tightly, and refrigerate until chilled throughout, at least 2 hours or preferably overnight.

Let the dough halves sit at room tempera- ture until the dough has warmed up some but is still cool to the touch, 15 to 20 minutes.

Put a sheet of parchment paper the same dimensions as a half sheet (13 by 18-inch) pan on the work surface and dust lightly with flour. Put one dough half on top.

Using a rolling pin, roll the dough half into a rectangle approximately 11 by 13 inches and 1⁄4 inch thick or slightly under. If the edges become uneven, push a bench scraper against the dough to straighten out the sides. To keep the dough from sticking to the parchment paper, dust the top with flour, cover with another piece of parchment paper, and, sandwiching the dough between both sheets of parch- ment paper, flip the dough and paper over. Peel off the top layer of parchment paper and continue to roll. Any time the dough starts to stick, repeat the sand- wiching and flipping step with the parchment paper.

Ease the dough and parchment paper onto a half sheet pan. Repeat with the remaining dough half and stack it on top. Cover with a piece of parchment paper and refrigerate the layers until firm, at least 30 minutes.

Heat the oven to 350°F. Line a couple of half sheet pans with parchment paper.

Let the dough sit at room temperature for up to 10 minutes. Invert the dough onto a work surface and peel off the top sheet of parchment paper. Roll a dough docker over the dough or pierce it numerous times with a fork. Using a 1 3⁄4 by 2 1⁄2-inch rectangular cutter, punch out the cookies. Reroll the dough trimmings, chill, and cut out more cookies.

Put the shortbread on the prepared sheet pans, evenly spacing up to 16 cookies per pan.

Bake one pan at a time for 10 minutes. Rotate the pan and bake until the cookies feel firm and hold their shape when touched, 3 to 5 minutes more. Let the cookies cool completely on the sheet pans. Repeat with the remaining pan.

Step #2: Frost the Cookies

Blend the halvah in a food processor until fairly smooth. Drizzle in the white chocolate and blend until incorporated. The halvah will turn into a thick paste.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the butter briefly on medium speed for 5 to 10 seconds. Add the sugar and beat until the butter mixture is aerated and pale in color, 3 to 4 minutes. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula to bring the frosting together. Briefly mix in the vanilla and salts until incorporated, approximately 1 minute. Add the halvah paste and mix until smooth, with a little texture left from the halvah.

Fit a pastry bag with the Ateco tip #32 and fill with the frosting.

Make pairs of similar-size cookies. Turn half of the cookies over. Leaving an 1⁄8-inch border, pipe rows of dots onto the cookies. The frosting should be approximately as thick as the cookie. Top each frosted cookie with a second cookie and press lightly to adhere.

Step #3: Finish the Cookies

Freeze the piece of halvah until chilled, 30 minutes.

Line two half sheet pans with parchment paper. Dip a quarter of the long side
of each sandwich cookie into the milk chocolate, shake off the excess, and place on the prepared pans. Using a vegetable peeler, shave a piece or two of halvah and place onto the chocolate- dipped part of each cookie. Refrigerate until the chocolate is firm, approximately 1 hour.

The cookies can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

Edible Radio: Put' Em Up! With Sherri Brooks Vinton

112612_SherriL-034rtOn the Kitchen Workshop, host Mary Reilly from Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks with Sherri Brooks Vinton about boiling-water canning and getting your kitchen "canning ready" so you can take advantage of the market when the mood strikes! Sherri is the author of the Put 'Em Up series of preserving and canning cookbooks. 

book_PEUcoverPutEmUpFruitPutemUpPreservingAnswer

Read on for recipes for Lemon-Ginger Marmalade and Pickled Mushrooms. Learn more about Sherri and get more recipes at www.sherribrooksvinton.com.

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LEMON GINGER MARMALADE

153_cJenniferMayPhotography_LemonGingerMarmalade_PutEmUpFruitMakes 5 cups

Lemon and ginger, a classic combo of sunny and warm together in one great spread. The rind from the lemon give this marmalade some bite so it’s not all frills. This is a great topper for some hearty rustic bread that can stand up to a jam with attitude.

  • 2 pounds lemons (8–10)
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 1 (4-inch) knob fresh ginger, minced

Prepare

1. Using a vegetable brush, scrub the fruit with a nontoxic, odorless dish soap and hot water.

2. Cut off the tops and bottoms of the lemons deeply enough to remove the solid disks of pith and reveal the flesh of the fruit. Quarter the fruits and cut away the center rib. Flick out the seeds with the tip of your knife. Thinly slice the quartered lemons crosswise. Combine the lemon slices with the water in a large nonreactive pot and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat and set aside overnight to soften the rinds.

3. The next day, measure the volume of the lemon mixture (you should have about 4 cups). Return the lemon mixture to the pot and add an equal amount of sugar, along with the ginger. Slowly bring to a hard boil, stirring frequently to avoid burning the sugar. Continue cooking until gel stage is reached (see page 28), about 15 minutes.

4. Remove from the heat. Allow the marmalade to rest for 5 minutes, giving it an occasional gentle stir to release trapped air; it will thicken slightly. Skim off any foam.

Preserve.

Can

Use the boiling-water method as described on page 20. Ladle the marmalade into clean, hot 4-ounce or half-pint jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace between the top of the marmalade and the lid. Run a bubble tool along the inside of the glass to release trapped air. Wipe the rims clean; center lids on the jars and screw on jar bands until they are just fingertip-tight. Process the jars by submerging them in boiling water to cover by 2 inches for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat, remove the canner lid, and let the jars rest in the water for 5 minutes. Remove the jars and set aside for 24 hours. Check the seals, then store in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year.

 

PICKLED BUTTON MUSHROOMS

216_cJenniferMayPhotographyInc_PickledMushrooms_PutEmUpMakes about 2 pints

A number of cultures lay claim to mushroom pickles: Italy, Germany, and Poland all have their style with these tasty bites. I’ve taken the United Nations’ approach — this is a mash-up recipe that takes a little bit from each tradition.

  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 1/2 teaspoon fennel seed
  • 1 pound white button mushrooms, stemmed
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 small red bell pepper, seeded and chopped

PREPARE

Combine the vinegar, brown sugar, bay leaves, salt, peppercorns, and fennel seed in a large nonreactive saucepan, and bring to a boil. Add the mushrooms, onion, and bell pepper and return to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes.

PRESERVE

Refrigerate: Transfer to bowls or jars. Cool, cover, and refrigerate for up to 3 weeks.

Can: Use the boiling-water method. Ladle into clean, hot pint canning jars, covering the solids by 1/4 inch with liquid. Leave 1/4 inch of headspace between the top of the liquid and the lid. Release trapped air. Wipe the rims clean; center lids on the jars and screw on jar bands. Process for 20 minutes. Turn off heat, remove canner lid, and let jars rest in the water for 5 minutes. Remove jars and set aside for 24 hours. Check seals, then store in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year.

Edible Radio: Modern Juicing With Mimi Kirk

Ultimate Book of Modern JuicingOur Kitchen Workshop host, Mary Reilly of Edible Pioneer Valley, talks with Mimi Kirk, the author of The Ultimate Book of Modern Juicing. In this fast-paced discussion they discuss making nut milks at home (you don't need anything more than a good blender), and ways to create juices on the fly––no recipes needed!

Read on for Mimi's recipes for Almond Milk and A Cold Killer juice, guaranteed to quash any spring sniffles.  

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32945576Almond Milk

Only 60 calories for an 8-ounce glass, and there’s no cholesterol or saturated fat so it’s heart healthy.

  • 1 cup almonds, soaked overnight
  • 3½ cups filtered water (more if you prefer a thinner milk)
  • 2 Medjool dates, pitted
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Strain soaked almonds and rinse well. Soaking releases the enzyme inhibitors and makes for easier digestion. Place nuts in high-speed blender and add water, dates, and vanilla, and process until smooth. Place a nut milk filter bag or paint strainer bag over a bowl, and then pour the almond milk into the bag. With one hand hold the top of the bag, and with the other hand proceed to squeeze all the milk from the bag into the bowl. If you don’t have a bag, a wire strainer or cheesecloth will work, but a bag makes the job easier. (A nut milk filter bag can be purchased online and paint strainer bags can be found at your local hardware store.)

Once all the liquid is squeezed into the bowl, pour it into a large glass container with a screw-top lid, such as a Mason jar, and store in the refrigerator. Milk will last about 3 to 4 days.

 

Chocolate Almond Milk

Cacao powder and cacao nibs are a great source of magnesium, which plays a role in muscle function, circulation, and bone strength.

  • 1½ cups almond milk
  • 3–4 tablespoons cacao powder (more if you like it richer)
  • 2–3 tablespoons maple syrup or 4–5 dates

Blend all ingredients adding maple syrup or dates to taste. Refrigerate to chill.

 

mimi-kirkA Cold Killer

  • 1 bunch parsley
  • 2 small garlic cloves
  • ½ beet
  • 1 carrot
  • 2 oranges, juiced
  • 1-inch piece of ginger
  • Liquid of choice as needed

Blend all ingredients, adding liquid as necessary.

EDIBLE RADIO: Tomatomania!

TomatomaniaKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Scott Daigre about his book Tomatomania. Written with Jenn Garbee, Tomatomania tell us all we need to know about selecting, planting and growing gorgeous juicy tomatoes!

We talked about planting the perfect tomato plot and his favorite tomato recipe. Learn more about becoming a tomatomaniac at www.tomatomania.com.

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Favorite Tomato recipeMy Favorite Tomato Recipe

Rigorously tested countless times. Foolproof. Pick a ripe, beautifully colored, and slightly soft tomato off the vine. The only thing better than trying this with one perfectly ripe, juicy tomato? Trying it with ten perfectly ripe tomatoes of different colors and types. You’re welcome!

WASH IT. (Or not.)

CUT IT. (Or not.)

SALT IT. (Or not.)

EAT IT. (Best done outdoors.)

Sure, many of you will eliminate the salt-it step and that’s fine with me. You’ve worked really hard to get to this step and final product. Don’t miss the opportunity to savor the basic essence of this crop you’ve grown in your own backyard. Dive right in!

Pineapple (Tomato) Upside-Down Cake

Makes 1 cake; 8 to 10 servings

image001Super sweet and citrusy tomatoes alike are pretty near perfect in this rustic cornmeal cake. Use bicolor yellow varieties splashed with streaks of red, such as sweet Pineapple tomatoes (you bet there is a Pineapple variety!) if you have them. Citrusy green tomatoes mellow a bit color-wise when baked, but are also fantastic.

1 pound (1 very large or two medium) very ripe, sweet tomatoes

8 tablespoons (1 stick) plus 3 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature, divided, plus more to butter the cake pan

½ cup dark brown sugar, packed

2 teaspoons orange zest, packed (about 1 medium orange), fruit reserved for juicing

1 teaspoon lemon zest, packed (about 1 medium lemon)

½ cup honey

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

½ cup sour cream

¼ cup freshly squeezed orange juice

¾ cup all-purpose flour

1 cup cornmeal

1½ teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

Crème fraîche and honey, to serve (optional)

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly butter a 9-inch round cake pan, line the bottom with parchment paper, and butter the paper. Slice the tomatoes 1⁄3 inch thick and spread them out on paper towels to drain.
  1. Melt 3 tablespoons butter over medium-high heat in a small saucepan. Add the brown sugar and cook just until the sugar is melted, about 1 minute. Pour the brown sugar paste into the prepared cake pan and immediately spread it out as evenly as possible using a heat-proof spatula. Combine the orange and lemon zests and sprinkle 1 teaspoon over the top of the brown sugar.
  1. Combine the remaining 8 tablespoons butter, honey, eggs, sour cream, orange juice, and remaining 2 teaspoons of orange-lemon zest in a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and mix well. (Alternatively, use a hand mixer.) In a small bowl, whisk the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, baking soda, and salt, add the butter mixture, and mix until just combined.
  1. Blot any moisture off the tomatoes and arrange them decoratively in the bottom of the pan. (I like to leave a little space between the slices to see the patterns in each). Pour the batter over the tomatoes. Bake until the cake is lightly brown, starts to pull away from the sides, and a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean, 45 to 50 minutes. Allow the cake to cool in the pan on a wire rack for 20 minutes. Run a knife around the edges of the pan, place a serving plate on top, and (wearing oven mitts!), flip the cake onto the plate. Allow the cake to cool completely. To gild the lily, serve the cake with a dollop of creme fraiche and a drizzle of honey.

Prime picks: Sweet bicolors like Pineapple, Gold Medal, or Grandma Viney’s Yellow Pink, or citrusy green varieties such as Ananas Noire (Black Pineapple) or Aunt Ruby’s German Green.

EDIBLE RADIO: THE YELLOW TABLE COOKBOOK WITH ANNA WATSON CARL

The Yellow Table cover So, you want to write a cookbook? Join us on the Kitchen Workshop and learn how to publish your own!

Host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley is joined by Anna Watson Carl, the author of The Yellow Table Cookbook. The path from inspiration to publication has many steps and Anna leads us through the path she followed. This is a great sneak-peek at the cookbook production process for potential authors and cookbook enthusiasts alike. 

The-Cookbook-Diaries-5

The Yellow Table Cookbook was released in late 2014 and its first print run of 3,000 copies sold out in under two months! Anna is currently preparing to reprint the book in 2015, check in at The Yellow Table for updates.

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EDIBLE RADIO: COOKING ALLERGY-FREE WITH JENNA SHORT

The holidays are stressful enough, but cooking for friends and family with food allergies shouldn't be. Mary talks with Jenna Short about her book Cooking Allergy-Free.  On this episode of the The Kitchen Workshop, Jenna helps us navigate the challenges of preparing delicious food for friends and family while safely managing food allergies.

Jenna is the owner of Shortbread NYC, a boutique events focused on gluten-free, vegan, dairy-free, Kosher, and sugar-free goods. 

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EDIBLE RADIO: SAVEUR'S THE NEW CLASSICS, SANDWICHES AND SPICE RUBS WITH HELEN ROSNER

covernewclassicsKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley is joined by Helen Rosner. Helen is an editor, writer and photographer. She is also a contributing editor at Saveur magazine, where she was responsible for wrangling over 1000 recipes into the book: The New Classics Cookbook.

In this action-packed podcast, Mary and Helen cover home-made spice rubs and blends, including a fresh poultry seasoning that will change how you cook chicken. Then they discuss the similarity between sandwiches and home construction, get salty discussing the classic dish: Sh** On a Shingle, the relatively unknown Schnitzel and the perfect Italian Beef Sandwich.

Recipes for Homemade Fresh Poultry Seasoning and Schnitzel below.

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Homemade Fresh Poultry Seasoning

Our fresh poultry seasoning blend puts the jarred stuff to shame. This pungent, lively mix leaves out salt, so you can add it directly to turkey, stuffing, or chicken without fear of overseasoning.  

MAKES ABOUT ½ CUP

  • 3 tbsp. finely chopped thyme
  • 3 tbsp. finely chopped rosemary
  • 3 tbsp. finely chopped sage
  • 1 tbsp. finely chopped marjoram
  • ½ tbsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp. celery seeds
  • 1 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 tsp. ground ginger
  • 1 tsp. smoked paprika

Combine thyme, rosemary, sage, marjoram, pepper, celery seeds, nutmeg, ginger, and paprika in a bowl or jar and mix well. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. 

  

Schnitzel Sandwich

Serves 4

Schnitzi Schnitzel Bar, in Brooklyn, New York, makes nine different types of schnitzel—a breaded chicken sandwich popular in Israel and in Orthodox Jewish enclaves in the U.S.—and serves them with 13 varieties of homemade sauce. This recipe is an adaptation of the restaurant’s chile-flecked “Spanish” schnitzel, one of its most popular variations. 

Edible Pioneer Valley note: Don't get discouraged by the number of ingredients and components listed. The sauces can be made ahead or you can substitute other sauces and spreads of your choice.

FOR THE PESTO SAUCE

  • 61⁄2 cups packed fresh basil leaves
  • 3⁄4 cup plus 2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 tbsp. pine nuts, toasted 
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

FOR THE RED CHIMICHURRI SAUCE:

  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • ¾ cup roughly chopped roasted red bell peppers
  • ¼ cup distilled white vinegar
  • 1½ tbsp. kosher salt
  • 1 tbsp. red wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp. sweet paprika
  • 1 tbsp. finely chopped oregano
  • 1½ tsp. crushed red chile flakes
  • ½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ tsp. ground cumin
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 bunch flat-leaf parsley

 FOR THE SCHNITZEL

  • 4 cups flour
  • 8 eggs, beaten
  • 4 cups dried bread crumbs
  • 1⁄2 cup crushed red chile flakes 
  • 12 1⁄4′′-thick chicken cutlets
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1⁄4 cup canola oil
  • 2 medium onions, thinly sliced lengthwise 
  • 4 12′′ French baguettes, split
  • Sweet chile sauce, to taste
  • 4 cups loosely packed shredded romaine lettuce 
  • 3 ripe tomatoes, thinly sliced
  • 1⁄2 cup sliced dill pickles

Make the pesto: Combine basil, oil, nuts, garlic, salt, and pepper in a food processor and process until smooth; transfer to a small bowl and set aside.

Make the chimichurri: Clean the food processor, then add oil, peppers, white vinegar, salt, wine vinegar, paprika, oregano, chile flakes, pepper, cumin, garlic, parsley, and 1⁄4 cup water. Process until smooth; transfer to a small bowl and set aside.

Place flour, eggs, and bread crumbs mixed with chile flakes in three separate shallow dishes. Season flour and chicken with salt and pepper. Working in batches, coat cutlets with flour, shaking off excess. Dip in eggs, then dredge in bread crumb mixture. Set aside.

Heat oil in a 12′′ skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches, add cutlets and cook, turning once, until golden brown, 4–6 minutes. Transfer to paper towels to drain. Once all cutlets are cooked, add half the onions to skillet and cook, stirring often, until soft and caramelized, about 8 minutes.

Place 3 cutlets on bottom half of each baguette and cover with sauces, to taste. Top each with lettuce, tomatoes, remaining raw onions, cooked onions, and pickles. Cover with top half of baguette.

EDIBLE RADIO: MARK BITTMAN–SIMPLE CHANGES HAVE MAXIMUM IMPACT

How To Cook Everything FastKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley speaks with Mark Bittman. Mark is probably most famous for his cookbooks How to Cook Everything, How to Cook Everything Vegetarian, and Vegan Before 6. He is now an opinion columnist for the New York Times and many other publications. He focuses on policy, agriculture, health, the environment as well as cooking and eating. He’s an outspoken advocate of the idea that we all just need to cook more. His new book How To Cook Everything Fast is in bookstores now.

Mary and Mark discuss the simple changes we can all make to improve our diets. Mark also outlines the many ways we can take action outside our own kitchens.

You can find links to Mark’s books, videos and columns at MarkBittman.com. Look for How to Cook Everything Fast at your favorite bookseller. 

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Watch Mark’s keynote address at the 2014 Edible Institute. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qw96T1n-rQ8 

 

EDIBLE RADIO: KALE GLORIOUS KALE WITH CATHERINE WALTHERS

Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley is joined by Catherine Walthers. Cathy is a personal chef and food writer. She is the author of four cookbooks, the latest of which is Kale, Glorious Kale.

Join us in the Workshop as Mary and Cathy discuss varieties of kale, the perfect kale chip and kale cocktails! Cathy also shares her secret for making the perfect kale salad (hint: it involves massage therapy!).

Look below for recipes for Kale Granola and an Emerald Gimlet. Delicious ways to detox!

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Kale Granola

Makes about 2 quarts

The combination of kale, oats, and nuts is crunchy and satisfying. Everyone likes to munch on this as a snack – it doesn’t even seem to last until breakfast to top yogurt, mix with fruit, or serve with milk.  It’s easy to vary the nuts and the dried fruit with your favorites.

5 cups curly kale (stripped from stalk, chopped or torn into large bite-size pieces, rinsed and dried well)

6 tablespoons virgin coconut oil, divided

3/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 cup light brown sugar

6 tablespoons pure maple syrup

3 cups rolled oats

1 cup broken pecans, broken walnuts or sliced almonds

1/2 cup sunflower seeds

1/4 cup sesame seeds

1 cup dried cranberries, roughly chopped

1/4 cup dried apricots, chopped

1/4 cup raisins, roughly chopped

1.  Preheat the oven to 300 °F.

2. Make sure the kale is well dried. Place the kale in a bowl with 1 tablespoon coconut oil and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Knead or massage with your hands until the coconut oil is rubbed on all the leaves. Set aside.

3. In a small bowl, whisk together the remaining 5 tablespoons coconut oil, and the brown sugar, maple syrup, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt.  In another larger bowl, combine the oats, nuts, and seeds.

4.  Take 2 tablespoons of the wet ingredients and combine with the kale. Rub it over the leaves. Pour the rest over the oats, seeds and nuts and mix very well until incorporated and oats are completely covered.

5. Line two 12- by 17-inch baking sheets with parchment paper or a silicone mat. Place the oats on one sheet, spreading them out evenly, and the kale on the other sheet. (The kale seems to crisp up better separately, but you can mix the kale and oats together and it will work.) Bake all for 25-30 minutes, mixing 2 or 3 times to prevent the outer edges from burning, and also rotating the trays. I sometimes switch the oven setting to convection bake if the mixture doesn’t seem to be crisping up. Remove the kale when it is crispy, but not browned. Remove the oats when they are crispy or nearly crispy and before the nuts are burned. Both with get crispier once they sit on the counter cooling.

6.  When cooled, combine the kale with the oats. Add the dried fruit. Pack into mason jars for storage.

Cook’s Note: I’ve switched to coconut oil instead of canola oil for making granola (though substitute canola or another vegetable oil if that is what you have.) I love the subtle flavor coconut adds, and nutritionists are recommending its healthier properties. In warmer weather, coconut oil looks like an oil; in cooler weather it tends to solidify. For this recipe, if solidified, I usually put the jar in a saucepan of hot water until it becomes liquid again. Also, if you mix it with cold maple syrup it tends to solidify again which makes it hard to coat the oats and kale, so I usually just have maple room temp or heat it up very slightly before mixing the liquid ingredients.

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Emerald Gimlet

Serves 1

Juice a few kale leaves in a juicer and store  in the fridge until ready for your cocktails. If you don’t have a juicer, you can make kale juice in a blender by puréeing several kale leaves with just enough water to get the blender moving. Purée until as smooth as possible then strain for juice. You need a fine strainer to remove the fresh grated ginger for a smooth, chilled emerald green gimlet.

2 ounces gin (or vodka)

1/2 ounce fresh kale juice

1/2 – 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated*

3/4 ounce fresh lime juice

3/4 ounce simple syrup

Lime wheel or small kale leaf for garnish

1.     In a mixing glass or shaker, add the gin, kale, ginger, lime and syrup. Fill halfway with ice and shake vigorously for about 20 seconds until very well chilled. Double strain through a small fine mesh strainer to catch the fresh ginger into a martini or coupe glass.  Garnish with a lime wheel/and or a small piece of kale.

*  Add 1 teaspoon of fresh grated ginger if you love ginger.

Cook’s Note: To make simple syrup, add 1 cup of sugar to 1 cup of boiling water and stir until dissolved. Store in a mason jar; it keeps for weeks.

EDIBLE RADIO: TWELVE RECIPES WITH CAL PETERNELL

Twelve RecipesKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Cal Peternell about his book Twelve Recipes. Cal been a part of the team at Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California for nearly twenty years and is currently the chef of the downstairs restaurant.

Cal Peternell, photo credit  Ed Anderson

His book embraces the idea that we should know how to cook a few things well. Then we can use those recipes as springboard for more creative thought. Twelve Recipes is written from a professional chef’s perspective, so experienced cooks will feel as if they have found a peer in its pages. But, it’s written from a father’s point of view as well; so a less-experienced cook will also find a comforting voice. Learn more about Cal Peternell at CalPeternell.com, and pick up a copy of Twelve Recipes at your favorite local bookseller!

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EDIBLE RADIO: CAKE GURU ROSE LEVY BERANBAUM

beranbaum_rose

Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Rose Levy Beranbaum about her latest book, The Baking Bible. They discuss her unique ingredient grid system and that fact that with ten cookbooks under her belt, she learns something new every time.

PLUS! Three great recipes from her new book below the fold: Chocolate Hazelnut Tart, Praline Pecan Meringue Cookies, and Hazelnut Praline Mousse.

Learn more about Rose at RealBakingWithRose.com


Order The Baking Bible from a local, independent bookseller

 

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KITCHEN WORKSHOP: CREAM PUFFS AND MORE WITH DORIE GREENSPAN

Dorie Greenspan – Photo by Alan Richardson

The Kitchen Workshop Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Dorie Greenspan about her latest book Baking Chez Moi, Recipes from my Paris Home to your Home Anywhere. Listen and learn about falling in love (with pastry), the intricacies of working with French butter in American kitchens and the secret of “The French Bake”.

Learn more about Dorie Greenspan

Order the book from a local, independent bookseller:


Shop Indie Bookstores

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We discussed success with cream puffs on the show. Here is Dorie’s recipe for Chocolate Cream Puffs with Mascarpone Filling

Chocolate Cream Puffs with Mascarpone Filling
Makes 15 puffs

For about twenty-four hours, I thought I had invented chocolate pâte à choux, and those hours were pretty sweet. I’d never tasted chocolate cream puffs, I’d never seen them and I was so tickled that I’d made them. And then chocolate cream puffs seemed to pop up in books and magazines, pâtisseries and restaurants everywhere. Had I just never noticed?

While everything made with pâte à choux is dramatic, these are both dramatic and sexy. It’s the magic of that vixen, cocoa. There’s not much of it in the dough, but it’s enough to transform the traditional cream puff, to turn it dark, dark brown and to give it a true chocolate flavor.

The puffs make wonderful Profiteroles and they’re fun with a crackle top, but I like them most filled with something velvety, like chocolate mousse or a mix of mascarpone and whipped cream, as in this recipe. Consider going totally romantic and adding a little rose extract (available online) to the mascarpone filling, maybe even tinting it pink, and then surprising your Valentine with a platter piled high with puffs.

For the cream puffs

½ cup (68 grams) all-purpose flour
1½ tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/3 cup (80 ml) water
¼ cup (60 ml) whole milk
½ stick (4 tablespoons;
2 ounces; 57 grams) unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 tablespoon sugar
¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
2 large eggs, at room temperature
For the filling
½ cup (113 grams) mascarpone, chilled
½ cup (120 ml) very cold heavy cream
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract or ½ teaspoon pure rose extract, preferably Star Kay
White, or rose water to taste
Red food coloring (optional)
Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting To make the puffs:

Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.

Sift the flour and cocoa together into a small bowl.

Put the water, milk, butter, sugar and salt in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the flour and cocoa all at once, lower the heat to medium-low and, using a wooden spoon or sturdy heatproof spatula, stir like mad. The mixture will come together in a ball and there will be a film on the bottom of the pan, but don’t stop stirring—give it another minute of energetic beating. Transfer the hot dough to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or a large bowl in which you can use a hand mixer, and let it rest for 2 minutes.

Beat the dough for 1 minute, then add the eggs one by one, beating very well after each egg goes in. You’ll have a smooth, shiny dough.

Place mounds of dough on the baking sheets using a small cookie scoop (one with a 2-teaspoon capacity, my tool of choice) or dropping the dough by small spoonfuls; leave about 2 inches between them.

Slide the baking sheet into the oven, then immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees F. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, rotating the sheet at the midway point, or until the puffs feel hollow and lift off the paper or mat easily. Cool to room temperature on a cooling rack before filling.

To make the filling:

Put the mascarpone in a medium bowl and, using a flexible spatula, stir it gently to loosen it. Beating makes mascarpone grainy, so go easy.

Whip the heavy cream in a small bowl just until it starts to thicken. Beat in the sugar and vanilla or rose extract and continue to whip until the cream holds medium peaks. If you’re using red food coloring, add a drop and mix it in, then add more coloring, if needed. Continue to mix until the cream holds firm peaks. Stir a spoonful of the cream into the mascarpone to lighten it, then gently fold in the remainder.

(The cream can be made a few hours ahead and refrigerated.)

To fill the puffs: Just before serving, cut or carefully pull the cream puffs apart at their middles. If you’d like, you can hollow out the base of the puffs by removing the custardy interior. (I like the creamy center and always leave it.) Spoon or pipe some filling (using a pastry bag with a plain tip or a zipper-lock plastic bag from which you’ve snipped off a corner) into the base of each puff; replace the tops. If you’d like, the puffs can be chilled for about 30 minutes.

Dust the puffs with confectioners’ sugar just before serving.

Serving:

The puffs should be served at room temperature or slightly chilled. If you want to go deliciously overboard, you could pass some chocolate sauce at the table. Storing: The cream puffs can be scooped and frozen for up to 2 months before baking—bake them from the freezer, no defrosting necessary. And the cream filling can be made a few hours ahead and kept refrigerated. However, it’s best to fill the puffs just before serving.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Edible Radio: More from Saveur's India Issue with Kellie Evans

saveur coverWe spoke with Kellie Evans, an Associate Editor at Saveur Magazine, about Saveur’s India Issue. As the hunter, gatherer and writer of recipes for Saveur she gives us a behind-the-scenes look at how recipes are produced for each issue.

On this podcast we talk about how recipes come together for each issue and the challenges of producing the recipes published in the India Issue and recipes for Caramel Lassi, Aamba Khatta (Sweet and Sour Mango Pickle), and Dosas.

Listen to our podcast with Betsy Andrews for more about the India Issue.  Visit the Saveur website to find the entire India Issue plus the stories that couldn’t fit into the magazine.

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Recipes from this episode 

These links will take you to Saveur's website.

Aamba Khatta
(Sweet and Sour Mango Pickle) 

saveur__aamba

Dosas

saveur__dosa 

 

Palakoora Vepadu
(Andhra-Style Sautéed Spinach)

saveur__palakoora

Aloo Masala
(South Indian Masala Potatoes)

saveur_aloo

 

 Ghanta Tarkari
(Mixed Vegetable Coconut Curry)

saveur__ghanta 

Caramel Lassi

saveur__lassi

 

Edible Radio: Saveur's Betsy Andrews Takes Us to India

BETSY ANDREWS HEDSHOTWe spoke with Betsy Andrews, Acting Editor in Chief of Saveur Magazine, about Saveur’s India Issue.  Join us on this podcast for a discussion of the culinary traditions of different regions of India. Betsy was a visitor at a wedding in Kashmir and tells us about the traditional wedding caterer (waza) and the 36-dish feast (wazwaan) he prepares. Enjoy the flavors of a Kashmiri wedding with Mirchi Qorma (Kashmiri Lamb in Chile Sauce).  

She also takes us to the Kashmiri city of Srinagar and together we visit its marvelous floating gardens and boat markets. 

Listen to the second podcast in this series in which we discuss the recipes in this issue. Visit the Saveur website to find the entire India Issue plus the stories that couldn’t fit into the magazine.  

On this episode, Betsy Andrews of Saveur Magazine describes her visit to the Kashmir region of India. As we recorded, in early September 2014, news reports describing the worst monsoon flooding and landslides in 100 years started to come out of the region. As of September 17, the current death toll from the floods in Indian Kashmir is estimated at over 200, and tens of thousands of residents are homeless. Our thoughts go out to the victims of the disaster.

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Recipes from this episode 

These links will take you to Saveur's website.

Maacher Johl 
(Bengali-Style Fish Stew)
 

saveur__maacher

 Mirchi Qorma 
(Kashmiri Lamb in Chile Sauce) 

saveur__mirchi

Sevaya Kheer 
(Vermicelli Milk Pudding)

saveur_ 

Shahi Tukra 
(Royal Toast)
 

saveur__tukra

Smita Chandra’s Rasam 
(Spicy Tamarind Soup)

saveur__rasam 

 

 

Edible Radio: The Kitchen Workshop with Maggie Battista

575130_10152252237115461_1166282910_nKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, publisher and editor of Edible Pioneer Valley, talks with Maggie Battista, cook, writer and traveler! Maggie is the proprietress of EatBoutique a website and artisanal foods emporium; and is the author of the upcoming book Food. Gift. Love. LISTEN TO THIS PODCAST NOW.

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes.

Thirsty? Here are several of the recipes from the show, courtesy of EatBoutique:

Rhubarb Cordial

How to make fruit cordials

Limoncello

Making fruit vinegars

How to make a fruit syrup Combine equal parts fruit, sugar and water (by volume) in a saucepan and bring to a simmer. When the syrup is brightly colored (this will take 5-10 minutes with softer fruit like blueberries or strawberries and over 15 minutes with less-tender fruit like rhubarb. Strain and let cool before using in a drink.

Here are the cocktails we made on the show:

Rhubarb-orange Sidecar

  • 1.5 oz  fresh orange
  • Juice 1.5 oz lemon juice
  • 1 oz rhubarb syrup
  • 1 1/2 oz brandy

Combine in an iced cocktail shaker. Shake hard until chilled and strain into a cocktail glass.

Strawberry-basil Cocktail

  • 1/2 ounce strawberry syrup
  • ½ ounce lime juice
  • 4 basil leaves
  • 2 ounces gin, preferably Hendrick’s or a Plymouth style (use vodka if you prefer)

Combine in an iced cocktail shaker. Shake hard until chilled and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a basil leaf.  

Cheers!

Edible Radio: The Kitchen Workshop with Mary Beth Shaddix

CLPF_FM_006d_RS-200x300Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, publisher and editor of Edible Pioneer Valley, talks with Mary Beth Shaddix, gardener, writer and recipe developer to discuss container gardening options for every garden. Mary Beth is the co-owner of Maple Valley nursery, near Birmingham, Alabama and also writes and blogs for Cooking Light magazine. She can be found at www.marybethshaddix.com and simmerandboil.cookinglight.com.

LISTEN TO THIS PODCAST NOW.

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes.

Find out more about becoming a Master Gardener on the American Horticultural Society's website.

 

Feeling hungry? Here are Mary Beth's recipes from the show. Thanks to Mary Beth and Cooking Light for their permission to share them with you.  Pick up your own copy of  Cooking Light Pick Fresh here.

Potato and Vegetable Salad with Mustard Ranch
Hands-on time: 10 min. Total time: 20 min.
Serves 8 (serving size: 1 cup).
Photo Credit: Johnny Autry; Styling: Cindy Barr

PickFresh_cover_0207asp.inddYou could use any waxy, thin-skinned potato for this salad, such as La Ratte or Russian Banana fingerlings, freshly dug red new potatoes, or even Yukon gold if you are buying from the produce aisle. The key is to highlight the colorful varieties available and the smaller, more special treats you can grow yourself or find in farmers’ markets.

2 pounds multicolored fingerling potatoes, unpeeled and cut intobite-sized pieces

11⁄2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided

1⁄4 cup plain 2% reduced-fat Greek yogurt

1⁄4 cup buttermilk

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

3⁄4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1⁄2 teaspoon honey

1 garlic clove, minced

PotatoSalad1 cup chopped red bell pepper (about 1 medium)

3⁄4 cup chopped celery

1⁄2 cup finely chopped onion

1⁄2 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

1⁄4 cup chopped fresh chives

2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill

1. Place potato pieces and 1 teaspoon salt in a medium saucepan, and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender but still hold their shape. Drain and rinse with cold water. Drain.

2. Combine 1⁄2 teaspoon salt, yogurt, and next 6 ingredients (through garlic) in a large bowl, stirring well with a whisk. Add potatoes, bell pepper, and remaining ingredients to yogurt mixture; toss gently to coat. 

CALORIES 107; FAT 0.7g (sat 0.3g, mono 0g, poly 0.2g); PROTEIN 3.7g; CARB 22.4g; FIBER 2.8g; CHOL 2mg; IRON 1.2mg; SODIUM 318mg; CALC 35mg

LemonKaleSaladLemony Kale Salad
Hands-on time: 14 min. Total time: 19 min.
Serves 6 (serving size: 1 cup).
Photo Credit: Johnny Autry; Styling: Cindy Barr

A simple lemon and oil dressing with quality pecorino cheese is a must-try. If you doubt the raw kale craze, harvest leaves after one or two winter frosts, when the starches convert to natural sugars. Lacinato kale is a good option for this salad, paired with the colorful chard variety Bright Lights.

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1 tablespoon olive oil

1⁄2 teaspoon sugar

1⁄2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1⁄4 teaspoon kosher salt

4 cups torn kale leaves

2 cups torn Swiss chard leaves

4 teaspoons unsalted pumpkinseed kernels

1⁄4 cup sliced green onions (about 2)

1 ounce shaved fresh pecorino Romano cheese (about 1⁄4 cup)

1. Combine first 5 ingredients, stirring until sugar dissolves. Add kale and chard; toss. Let stand 10 minutes.

2. While greens stand, heat a skillet over medium heat. Add kernels to pan, and cook 5 minutes or until browned, stirring frequently. Add kernels, onions, and cheese to greens; toss. 

CALORIES 65; FAT 4g (sat 0.8g, mono 2g, poly 0.8g); PROTEIN 2.6g; CARB 6.3g; FIBER 1.4g; CHOL 2mg; IRON 1.4mg; SODIUM 234mg; CALC 87mg

ShrimpandAioliCrispy Herbed Shrimp with Chive Aioli
Hands-on time: 31 min. Total time: 31 min.
Serves 4 (serving size: about 5 shrimp and 2 tablespoons sauce).
Photo: Johny Autry and Randy Mayor; Styling: Cindy Barr and Leigh Ann Ross

This dish is full of flavor-rich, fresh herbs in the breading and aioli. Chives are the standout in the aioli and many sauces because they lend a light onion flavor that isn’t overpowering. Keep a pot of them near your kitchen door, and move it to a windowsill in winter; you’ll find that snippets of chives go well atop many dishes year-round.

3⁄4 cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs), divided

1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme

1⁄8 teaspoon crushed red pepper

2 tablespoons cornstarch

2 large egg whites, lightly beaten

11⁄2 pounds large shrimp, peeled and deveined

1⁄4 teaspoon salt

1⁄4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons olive oil, divided

1⁄2 cup 2% reduced-fat Greek yogurt

1⁄4 cup canola mayonnaise

3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1⁄4 teaspoon ground red pepper

1. Place 1⁄4 cup panko, parsley, thyme, and crushed red pepper in a mini food processor; pulse to combine. Combine herb mixture with 1⁄2 cup panko in a shallow dish. Place cornstarch and egg whites in separate shallow dishes. Sprinkle shrimp with salt and black pepper. Dredge half of shrimp in cornstarch, shaking off excess; dip in egg whites. Dredge shrimp in panko mixture; press to adhere. Repeat procedure with remaining shrimp.

2. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add half of shrimp to pan; cook 3 minutes on each side or until done. Repeat with remaining oil and shrimp.

3. Combine yogurt and remaining ingredients in a small bowl. Serve with shrimp.

CALORIES 430; FAT 21.7g (sat 2.9g, mono 11.4g, poly 4.9g); PROTEIN 41.3g; CARB 14.8g; FIBER 0.7g; CHOL 265mg; IRON 4.4mg; SODIUM 583mg; CALC 115mg